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Constitution Day Activities For Students

September 17 is Constitution Day Activities for Students (in the past known as Citizenship Day, until it was changed in 2004). It is a federal requirement that all schools getting government funds show something the Constitution on this day. On the off chance that you’re like various educators, you get an email update from your significant a few days ago and need to throw something together quickly to guarantee you don’t dismiss government law! This year we have you covered. Since there are 27 redresses, here are 27 fun and huge ways you and your understudies can see Constitution Day.

1. Host a mock Constitutional Convention.

How was the Constitution created? Students love simulations! Have them take on different roles and create their own compromises.

2. Write your own constitution.

How would you create a country from scratch? Have students form a government with their own rights and rules.

3. Look at preambles from around the world.

How has the US Constitution influenced other countries? Check out these preambles and have students fill out a Venn diagram comparing a country of their choice to the United States. Want to go even deeper? Check out all of the constitutions in the world!

4. Study the Iroquois Constitution.

Did the Constitution’s democratic ideas came from the Iroquois, as some historians have suggested? Have students study the evidence and decide for themselves.

5. Do some  Hamilton Karaoke.

“Legacy! What is a legacy?” This one is mostly fun, but that’s okay. Kids and adults love the hit musical, and it has definitely increased interest in history. Blast it out during lunch or passing time and invite kids to sing along.

6. Watch the Crash Course on the US Constitution.

How was the Constitution a response to the Articles of Confederation? Watch John Green explain the background of how the Constitution was created. Students can chart how the Constitution fixed the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.

7. Color the Constitution.

Kids color these printable coloring pages that depict items from this time period.

8. Act out the Bill of Rights.

Where do our rights come from? As a class decide which of the first ten amendments is the most important today and perform a skit about it.

9. Play these online Constitution games.

Students can help restore the Bill of Rights or play one of three other online games for grades 2–12.

10. Watch Hip Hughes explain the Bill of Rights.

Watch the Bill of Rights Hand Game and practice memorizing the first 10 amendments.

11.Create a Founding Father hat craft.

Kids can create paper tricorne hats to look just like the Founding Fathers!

12. Show Schoolhouse Rock’s The Constitution or “I’m Just a Bill.”

 

Go old fashioned! Indeed, even secondary school understudies like to discuss their #1 kid’s shows. So share this exemplary with them. Follow up by having understudies compose their own Constitution-propelled melody or sonnet.

13. Discuss failed amendments.

Have students look at failed amendments, such as the Child Labor Amendment or the Equal Rights Amendment. Then have them discuss whether these amendments should be passed.

14. Propose a new Constitutional amendment.

What’s missing? Have students propose additional amendments that they think should be added to the Constitution, such as a balanced budget or eliminating term limits. Then have them design propaganda posters to convince their state to ratify it.

15. Eliminate a Constitutional amendment.

Task students with eliminating one amendment from the Bill of Rights. Which one? Why? Make a convincing argument.

16. Hold a debate about James Madison.

Image result for james madison funny

Is Madison the most underrated president in history? Have students debate the Father of the Constitution’s legacy.

17. Take a citizenship test.

After taking the test, students can decide what questions would they add or delete. Discuss whether or not they think a test for citizenship is necessary.

18. Invite a guest speaker into your class.

Invite a federal judge or someone who is a naturalized citizen to talk about the citizenship process.

19. Determine the best way to interpret the Constitution.

What is the correct way to interpret a 200-year-old document today? Students could apply the two approaches as a way to engage with current events.

20. Explore landmark Supreme Court cases.

What are some of the most important decisions made by the Supreme Court? How has the Supreme Court changed its interpretation of the Constitution over time?

21. Play Bill of Rights BINGO!

Here’s a spin on the classic BINGO game younger kids will love while learning important terms from the Bill of Rights.

22. Watch ConstitutionHall Pass Videos.

Check out the more than two dozen videos about a variety of aspects of the Constitution. The “Classroom Discussion Starter” ones have questions that go along with them.

23.Debate the Electoral College.

Have students discuss the Electoral College and debate whether it should be eliminated.

24. Discuss the branches of government.

Have students discuss which branch they think is the strongest. Has that always been the case? Make sure students provide evidence to prove support their claim

25. Learn your Constitutional rights on this fun site.

What are the rights of citizens? Explore this site for lessons on rights, games, and simulations.

26. Take a peek at the Newseum.

Primary sources and case studies from many angles tied to the Constitution.

27. Explore the Constitution by grade level.

Check out different versions of the Constitution for different grade levels.

Whatever you choose to do with your class on Constitution Day, have fun and help your students see the importance and wonder found in this document that started it all.

What are some of your favorite lessons to do on Constitution Day? Share your ideas in our WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook. 

Plus, check out our favorite websites for social studies teachers.

 

27 Classroom Ideas to Make Constitution Day Memorable

On September 17, schools the country over will dig into the U.S. Constitution—4,400 words that describe how our organization capacities. A 2004 law embraced by President George W. Fence set up September 17 as Constitution Day (as of late known as Citizenship Day). The law requires government delegates and schools that get regulatory resources for submit time on this day to discovering with respect to this 233-year-old record. A more prepared law, set up in 1956, saves September 17–23 as Constitution Week. Recognition the chances this report grants us in September and the whole year!

Constitution Day Activities for Elementary, Middle, and High School Students

No time this year to put together lessons or classroom activities for Constitution Day? We’ve got you covered! Here are six activities that can be adapted for a range of grade levels.

1. Democracy at Play (Educational Games; Grades 3–12)

Make discovering concerning the U.S. Constitution fun with iCivics’ games. Understudies can make a pass at running a Constitutional law office, in English or Spanish, with the game Do I Have a Right? They can moreover play Executive Command to experience what it takes after to run the Oval Office, and accept the trial of changing the three bits of our organization with Branches of Power. For truly learning fun, challenge understudies to figure out which Founding Father they are for the most part like by taking this quiz from the National Constitution Center.

2. Celebrate Your Rights (Poetry/Song Writing; Grades K–12)

Try going old-school to teach kids about the Constitution. Thanks to the catchy lyrics of this Schoolhouse Rock song, students will be able to recite the 52-word preamble in no time. Challenge them to write a poem or song about another part of the Constitution, such as the Bill of Rights. They might also choose to focus on a particular amendment, like the 13th amendment, which ended slavery in 1865, or the 19th amendment, which gave women the right to vote in 1920.

3. A Classroom Bill of Rights (Persuasive Writing; K–12)

Tell understudies that the essayists of the Constitution realized the archive would need to change with the occasions. Up until now, there have been 27 alterations to the Constitution. The initial 10 are known as the Bill of Rights. These incorporate ability to speak freely, religion, the press, and the option to gather. Have understudies watch this video from the National Constitution Center to find out with regards to the creation and confirmation of the Bill of Rights. In a rush? Here is a three-minute video explainer.

Then, challenge understudies to compose a Bill of Rights for your homeroom. The report ought to incorporate 10 of the rights and opportunities they expect in the homeroom, regardless of whether that is face to face or on the web. Start with an entire class conceptualize of alterations. Furnish understudies with a model or two to guarantee they get the thought:

Students have the right to express their opinions, as long as they do so respectfully.

  • Students have the right to a half hour of free time every day, as long as they follow rules.

Write up student ideas in a word document, revising it until three-fourths of the class has ratified it. Once your classroom Bill of Rights is finalized, share it with students so they can each sign it.

4. Constitutional Convention Up–Close (Art Analysis; K–12)

Display this painting of George Washington at the Constitutional Convention, in 1787.

Invite students to describe what they see:

  • What do you notice about the people in the painting?
  • What are the people in the painting doing?
  • Where is George Washington? Why do you think the painter put him there?
  • Do you think the people in the painting reflect the people who live in the United States today? Explain.
  • Tell students the Constitutional Convention brought together 55 men to represent their states in the creation of our government. If this convention were held today, who would you like to see represented? Explain.

5. Room for Debate (Opinion Writing; Grades 5–12)

It’s a point that has begun talk in the past comparably the present: Should the U.S. take out the Electoral College structure? Have your understudies form a persuading work fighting perhaps in help. They should fuse a short wide establishment about the Electoral College, which is shown in Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution. Advise understudies their paper should include: What the Electoral College is, the means by which it works, and why it was set up regardless. Then, they should give somewhere near two reasons they feel the system achieves or doesn’t work. For reward acknowledgment, they can find another report about the Electoral College and reference that article in their paper to help their conflict. Accepting you need to make it a step further, select star and con partners to have a conversation, coordinated like the authority conversations.

6. Presidential Powers (Research; Grades 3–8)

Tell understudies that they will make an assistance needed promotion for the work of U.S. president, utilizing subtleties from the Constitution and test help needed promotions. In the first place, give understudies a couple of test work promotions. Inquire: What sort of data do the promotions include? (Students should take note of that the advertisements incorporate occupation obligations, capabilities, and required skills.) What do you notice about the manner in which the data is organized? (Students may take note of the utilization of bulleted records, bolded words, or the request for information.) Next, give understudies a duplicate of Article II, Sections 1–4, of the U.S. Constitution and the “Help Wanted” activity sheet. Advise them to take notes on official obligations, capabilities, and abilities on the “Help Wanted” gift utilizing data they find in the Constitution. At long last, have understudies utilize their notes to compose an assistance needed advertisement for the situation of president. Permit time for understudies to impart their advertisements to the class.

 

Constitution Day Activities For Elementary School Students

Celebrating Constitution Day with your students on September 17th? Read on for several activity ideas for use in the elementary classroom. Use any or all of these activities to make Constitution Day a memorable experience for your students.

What is Constitution Day?

Prior to plunging into certain thoughts for Constitution Day exercises, we’ll pause for a minute to consider how this day affects the United States. Constitution Day is commended each year on September seventeenth. It commends the day on which the drafting of the U.S. Constitution was finished and afterward endorsed by 39 representatives at the Constitutional Convention – September 17, 1787.

More than 200 years after the fact, the U.S. Constitution is as yet the preeminent rule that everyone must follow, so invest some energy in class examining the significance of this notable occasion. Truth be told, in 2004, when Constitution Day was officially settled, the law expressed that any school that gets government reserves should have a program to teach understudies about the Constitution.

Constitution Day Activities

Although Constitution Day is September 17, Constitution Week runs from September 17 – September 23. So, feel free to use the whole week to take full advantage of all of these activities.

Explore the Constitution Throughout the DayIn the days leading up to Constitution Day, group your students and have each group do some simple research on different portions of the Constitution. Then, on Constitution Day, have groups present their research at a predetermined interval so that the presentations are given throughout the day (e.g., every half hour). This is a fun and engaging way to cover the whole of the Constitution in one school day.

Some lessons you may want to make available to your students are:

  • The US Constitution Lesson for Kids: Definition & Facts
  • Preamble to the Constitution Lesson for Kids
  • Articles of the Constitution: Lesson for Kids
  • Constitutional Rights Lesson for Kids

Amendment Mini-Posters

Materials

  • Sheets of paper
  • Art supplies

After a short prologue to the correction interaction, have understudies examine ways they should change the U.S. Constitution. Either independently or two by two, have understudies make a small banner (utilizing a standard piece of paper) that clarifies their proposed change. They ought to incorporate the explanation they are proposing this change or expansion.

You would then be able to have understudies present their banners, balance them around the room and lead an exhibition stroll during which understudies see every others’ banners and leave tacky note remarks. After all banners have been introduced and seen, you can permit the understudies to take an interest in a ‘authoritative vote’ to figure out which alterations they endorse.

Free Constitution Day Activities For Elementary

  • Biographies of the Founding Fathers – Recount how the Constitution was created and ratified. Learn about the Bill of Rights. Read biographies of the Founding Fathers.
  • Center for Civic Education – The Center for Civic Education, in collaboration with the American Association of School Administrators, offers lessons suggested for use at each of the grade levels, Kindergarten to Grade 12.
  • National Constitution Center: Fun & Simple fun ways to get Kids interested in Constitution Day. -Use their lesson plans or one of our great Constitution Day craft activities to just have a little fun with the Constitution. (Scroll to the bottom of that page to find the crafts)
  • Scholastic Lesson Plans – Preamble to the Constitution—What is Good Government Anyway? is a lesson plan written for Grades 3 to 5.The emphasis is on learning how some aspects of good government are included right in the Preamble.The culmination of the lesson is a mural.
  • The Constitution Explained for K-3 Students – The Constitution Explained is a synopsis of the Constitution, article by article, amendment by amendment in everyday language. This website is a good study guide for reading about the Constitution in language that people can understand.
  • The Constitution Explained for 4-7th Grade Students – The Constitution Explained is a synopsis of the Constitution, article by article, amendment by amendment in everyday language. This website is a good study guide for reading about the Constitution in language that people can understand.

Constitution Day Activities For Middle School Students

  • A More Perfect Union Students view a slideshow outlining events leading to the U.S. Constitution and participate in a discussion activity on “enduring questions.”
  • Biographies of the Founding Fathers – Recount how the Constitution was created and ratified. Learn about the Bill of Rights and read biographies of the Founding Fathers.
  • Center for Civic Education – The Center for Civic Education, in collaboration with the American Association of School Administrators, offers a variety of K-12 lessons.
  • Constitution Day Classroom Celebration Kit- Download a free, custom Constitution Day kits and get everything you need to celebrate in your classroom! Includes a “Constitutional Convention” video lesson , a poster-sized United States Constitution for your students to sign (or not) and have them make their own Preamble T-Shirts. You can tie everything together and finally, have students download the Interactive Constitution App, so they’ll have a pocket Constitution handy all year long!
  • ConstitutionDay.com website – Along with information on the Preamble and Ratification, this site provides an extensive list of Constitution facts, some items for sale, press releases, flyers and more.
  • Constitution Facts – ConstitutionFacts.com provides a series of free educational resources and Internet links to help educators celebrate Constitution Day each year.
  • EDSITEment!-National Endowment for the Humanities Constitution Day lessons
  • Full Text of the Articles of Confederation – Every textbook that discusses the Constitution identifies it as the replacement for the faulty Articles of Confederation. Here is a resource that gives the entire text of the Articles of Confederation, something not found in textbooks.
  • iCivics.Org – Online games, lessons, and materials on civics subjects, including the Constitution
  • Interactive Constitution Timeline – This interactive timeline of events marks more than 200 years of our constitutional history. These events tell the evolving story of our Constitution & the role it continues to play in our lives. See headlines, hear debates, explore graphs and maps.
  • Library of Congress- They have compiled a variety of materials from across its collections. Explore these rich resources and features to learn more about one of America’s most important documents.
  • State Bar of Michigan- These are lessons developed and/or compiled the State Bar of Michigan and are primarily focused on grades 6-7-8.

Constitution Day Activities For High School Students

  • Annenberg Classroom-These comprehensive resources include a Constitution Guide, Videos, Timelines, Issues, Games & Interactives, PDF lessons and iBooks
  • Bill of Rights Institute  – Creative lesson plans grouped into four categories including “American Lives, Primary Source Activities, Bill of Rights in the News and Landmark Supreme Court cases and the Constitution” are available on this site.
  • Biographies of the Founding Fathers – Recount how the Constitution was created and ratified. Learn about the Bill of Rights and read biographies of the Founding Fathers.
  • Center for Civic Education – The Center for Civic Education, in collaboration with the American Association of School Administrators, offers a variety of K-12 lessons.
  • ConstitutionDay.com website – Along with information on the Preamble and Ratification, this site provides an extensive list of Constitution facts, some items for sale, press releases, flyers and more.
  • Constitution Facts – ConstitutionFacts.com provides a series of free educational resources and Internet links to help educators celebrate Constitution Day each year.
  • Library of Congress- They have compiled a variety of materials from across its collections. Explore these rich resources and features to learn more about one of America’s most important documents
  • Major Debates of the Constitutional Convention – Students read an article on the major issues and compromises tackled during the Constitutional Convention and participate as commission members in discussing representation in the modern U.S. Senate.
  • National Archives Teaching With Documents – Lessons about the new nation using primary sources, including the U.S. Constitution.
  • National Constitution Center – This website is supported by the National Constitution Center, American Bar Association, Bill of Rights Institute, C-SPAN, Center for Educational Technologies, the Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools, The Constitution Project, The Council for Excellence in Government, courtTV, Justice Learning, The National Archives, and Scholastic. This kind of collaboration creates a sampler of the best work of the leading organizations for education about our government.
  • Our Documents.Gov – To help us think, talk and teach about the rights and responsibilities of citizens in our democracy, we invite you to explore 100milestone documents of American history. These documents reflect our diversity and our unity, our past and our future, and mostly our commitment as a nation to continue to strive to “form a more perfect union.
  • The Constitution & The 3 Branches of Gov: Lesson Plans – These three lessons were created by Amy Bloom, History/Social Studies Consultant at Oakland Schools.
    • Executive Branch Lesson(DOC)
    • Judicial Branch Lesson (DOC)
    • Legislative Branch Lesson (DOC)
  • Consource.org- While not specific to Constitution Day exclusively, this online resource for Constitutional research and education. Continually expanding in scope, it provides free public access to what is fast becoming the world’s most comprehensive online library of source documents related to the U.S. Constitution.
  • Constitution Day (PBS NewsHour) The 1965 Alabama Literacy Test- This is a unique opportunity to discuss the document itself in the context of voting and elections
  • Text of the Articles of Confederation (Full) – Every textbook that discusses the Constitution identifies it as the replacement for the faulty Articles of Confederation. Here is a resource that gives the entire text of the Articles of Confederation, something not found in textbooks.
  • U.S. Constitution Online Exhibit: National Archives and Records Administration – Essays, online exhibit, images of the original document, and a printer-friendly transcript.
  • Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom – Students read an article on the struggle for separation of church and state and participate in a hypothetical debate between James Madison and Patrick Henry on the issue.
  • New York Times Constitution Day Planning Guide – This guide is a compilation of planning suggestions from The New York Times Learning Network and the American Democracy Project.

The beginning of the year is feverish! There is generally such a huge amount to do, such countless methods to instruct, thus much information to gather. However, when the schedule flips to September one thing that is on the bleeding edge my brain is Constitution Day.

September seventeenth is Constitution Day. In case you are a government funded teacher than you realize that instructing about Constitution Day is commanded. The command states that “each instructive establishment that gets Federal assets is needed to hold an instructive program about the US Constitution for its students…” This implies that you do have to show exercises and if your school resembles mine, you need to present a blueprint of the exercises that you finished in class to your organization.

While I totally love teaching social studies and history to my understudies, Constitution Day ends up coming during an extremely bustling month.

That is why I love using these simple, yet powerful activities to teach my students about our country’s Constitution and celebrate this holiday with meaningful and timely tasks.

3 Powerful Constitution Day Activities for Elementary Students

Constitution Day Read Alouds and Discussions

The US Constitution and Preamble are not effectively absorbable for our understudies. That is the reason I love to peruse however many books as could be expected under the circumstances during Constitution Day week. These read-resoundingly books are an extraordinary method to assemble understudy foundation information prior to jumping into exercises. Through perusing and examining these books understudies will comprehend key ideas and jargon to assist them with understanding why we observe Constitution Day.

Try this: As you read have understudies write down jargon words that they are keen on looking further into. At the point when you are finished perusing, make a class rundown of jargon words. Allude back to the book to make meanings of the words all together. This is an extraordinary method to help understudies to utilize setting hints directly from the start of the school year.

If you are looking for a kid-friendly breakdown of the Preamble visit this SITE.
constitution day class constitution

 

 

Class Constitution vs U.S. Constitution

I love making a class constitution and looking into it with the US Constitution. It integrates the start of the year local area building exercises that you as of now do with the occasion of Constitution Day.

The main thing we talk about is the thing that a constitution is. A constitution is a bunch of coordinated guidelines that assists with directing how an association functions. By examining what a constitution is, understudies not just see how and why the U.S. Constitution was made yet additionally assists them with understanding why your homeroom needs a constitution, as well.

The key to creating a class constitution is to have students create it. Let the students brainstorm ideas while you jot them down. Have the kids create the language that they want to use to guide how their classroom works. When you are done crafting the class constitution with your kids, be sure to write it on large chart paper and then have students come up and sign their names, in pen of course, to make it official! Display it where all students can see it.

When you are done writing your class constitution, have students compare and contrast it with the U.S. Constitution that they are learning about. Grab the Venn diagram that I use with my students to complete this activity for FREE at the bottom of this post.

constitution day preamble activity elementary

 

Illustrate the US Constitution

What better approach to assist students with genuinely understanding the expressions of the Preamble than to have them delineate it? This is my #1 movement that we do on Constitution Day!

It is truly straightforward. Spread out the words to the preamble over a couple of pages. Have understudies delineate each set of words. In the wake of perusing the entirety of the books and talking about key jargon and making definitions together, this action will be simple for understudies.

You can have each student create their own book and delineate each page themselves, or you can have understudies work in a gathering and have individual understudies show one page to aggregate into the gathering’s book. In the event that you have understudies work in bunches you can keep the represented books that they made in your study hall library for understudies to visit and peruse the entire year!

Constitution Day is a significant day to perceive and celebrate with understudies and not on the grounds that it is ordered. I’m generally so invigorated by the significant discussions had and the significant work that the understudies do during this unit.

Making arrangements for exercises about the US Constitution doesn’t need to be distressing despite the fact that it comes during an unpleasant time. Save this page, pin for some other time, snatch the free download, that way every year your arrangements for Constitution Day are now done.

Happy teaching!

 

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