columbus day facts
Columbus Day

Columbus Day Facts

Columbus Day Facts: Christopher Columbus arrived in Bahamas, part of the Americas, on October twelfth, 1494. Columbus Day is intended to commend this appearance. Christopher Columbus was an Italian mariner, brought into the world in Genoa, Italy in 1451.

When is Columbus Day 2018? Its History, Facts and Traditions - Stemjar

He cruised with three boats and 90 team individuals on the journey that landed him in the Bahamas. Informally, Columbus Day has been commended in the U.S. since the last part of the 1700s, yet didn’t turn into an authority occasion anyplace until 1906, when it became state occasion in Colorado. It turned into a government occasion in 1934 in the United States. In 1971 it turned into a proper occasion, celebrated on the second Monday in October. Columbus Day is likewise celebrated in various nations including: Latin America, the Bahamas, Spain, Argentina, Belize and Uruguay. These nations have various names for the occasion however they all commend a similar occasion.Columbus Day Interesting Facts & Fun Information

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Columbus Day Fun Facts

  • Christoper Columbus started sailing when he was just 15 years old.
  • When he set sail to the expedition, he was provided with three boats by the city of Palos. The names of those three ships were the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria.
  • Columbus Day is celebrated on the second Monday in October. Before it turned into a legal national holiday in 1971, several nations celebrated Columbus Day on October 11.
  • Columbus Day marks Columbus’s first voyage to the Americas. Columbus landed on the island of Guanahani from the Bahamas on October 12, 1492.
  • Columbus’s crew consisted of 90 men and three boats. The objective of the trip was to graph a western sea route to the Indies, as well as related to reaching the islands in Asia rich in gold and spices.
  • One of Columbus’ ships, the Santa Maria, wrecked on the shore of the Americas and didn’t make the return voyage. 40 crewmen had to remain behind because there was no space on the other two boats. They stayed on the island Hispaniola.
  • Christopher Columbus traveled the New World three times.
  • Christoper Columbus died when he was 55, in 1506, just two decades after his final trip to the New World. Nobody knows where he’s buried as he had been reburied many times in various areas across the world.
  • Nobody is certain exactly what Columbus looked like, because there are no real portraits available.
  • Back in Virginia, Columbus Day is celebrated along with Yorktown Victory Day.
  • Since Christopher Columbus was Italian, Italian-Americans celebrate Columbus Day as a celebration of the heritage.
  • Depending on where you reside in the USA, you might visit parades to celebrate the holiday season. In most states, the kids have the day off from their schools.
  • New York City has the biggest Columbus Day parade. Over a million viewers enjoy watching the parade of 30,000+ marchers each year on Columbus Day.
  • In 1792, the firs-ever Columbus Day celebration was organized by The Society of St. Tammany and held at New York City (300th anniversary of Columbus’ voyage).
  • On April 7, 1907 – Colorado became the first state to announce Columbus Day a legal holiday.
  • In 1920, Columbus Day starts to be observed annually.
  • The initial national observance of Columbus Day was held under President Franklin D. Roosevelt on October 12, 1937.
  • Many historians agree that Columbus wasn’t the primary person nor the very first European, to discover the Americas. Native people were residing in the Americas for centuries before Columbus’ arrival.
  • Multiple cities, including Seattle, Los Angeles, Denver, Phoenix, San Francisco along with US states, such as Minnesota, Alaska, Vermont, and Oregon, have substituted Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day. The movement raises awareness of Columbus’ harsh treatment of native people and to honor and celebrate indigenous culture.
  • Berkeley, California was the first city to embrace Indigenous Peoples Day, in 1992.
  • Columbus’s expeditions are blamed for many disease outbreaks. New diseases that had previously been limited to Europe followed Columbus’s team to the New World. After 1492, diseases like smallpox, measles, whooping cough, chickenpox, typhus, and flu were transferred from people of the Old World to the New World and vice versa. Researchers classify this as being one of the biggest demographic disasters in history.

Columbus Day Facts or Myths? by Richard Giso | Teachers Pay Teachers

Interesting Columbus Day Facts:

Christopher Columbus was born in 1451 in Genoa, Italy. He began sailing when he was only 15 years old.
When he set sail for the expedition, he was given three ships by the city of Palos.
He set sail in August of 1492. It was 35 days before a sailor spotted land.
The names of the three ships were the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria.
His crew consisted of 90 men.
The goal of the expedition was to chart a western sea route to India and China, as well as to the islands in Asia with spices and gold.
When Christopher Columbus landed in the Bahamas in 1492, he was the first European since the 10th century to have the opportunity to explore the Americas.
The Santa Maria did not make the return trip to Spain because it ran aground on Christmas Day. 40 men had to stay behind because there was no room on the other two ships. They stayed behind on the island Hispaniola.
Christopher Columbus made the voyage to the New World three times.
He died when he was 55, in 1506, only two years after his last trip to the New World.
Nobody is sure where he is buried as he was reburied many times in different places around the world.
Nobody is sure what he looked like, as there are no portraits known to exist.
President Roosevelt made Columbus Day a national holiday in 1934.
In 1971, the date October 12th no longer marked the holiday. It was changed to the second Monday in October. This is also the Canadian Thanksgiving, which was fixed in 1959).
South Dakota, Alaska and Hawaii do not recognize Columbus Day.
In Latin America they call this day Día de la Raza; in the Bahamas they call it Discovery Day; in Spain they call it Fiesta Nacional and Día de la Hispanidad; in Argentina they call it Día del Respeto a la Diversidad Cultural; in Belize they call it Day of the Americas, and in Uruguay they call it Day of the Americas.
In Puerto Rico, Columbus Day is celebrated along with Puerto Rico Friendship Day.
In Virginia, Columbus Day is celebrated along with Yorktown Victory Day.
Because Christopher Columbus was Italian, Italian-Americans celebrate Columbus Day as a celebration of their heritage.
Depending on where you live in the United States, you may see parades to celebrate the holiday. In most states, the children have the day off school.
New York City has the largest parade.

 

Columbus Day Facts And Trivia - Design Corral

Did you know that although Columbus Day has been celebrated since the 1700s, it didn’t become a federal holiday until 1934? The United States and several other countries celebrate the day that Christopher Columbus arrived in the Americas. Here are a few quick facts about the history of Columbus Day.

1.  Columbus and his crew of 90 men set sail in August of 1492. 35 days later, they spotted land.

2.  The Niña, The Pinta, and The Santa Maria originally set sail to reach India, China, and the Asian islands in search of spices and gold. Instead, they found the “New World” when they came upon the Bahamas.

3.  Columbus Day was previously celebrated on October 12th but is now celebrated on the second Monday in October.

4.  Christopher Columbus Died in 1506, at the age of 55.

5.  South Dakota, Florida, Vermont, New Mexico, Maine, Alaska, and Hawaii no longer recognize Columbus Day. It has been replaced with other celebrations such as Indigenous people Day, Discoverers’ Day, and native American Day. This change in celebration is likely to become more widely recognized.

6.  Columbus started sailing when he was only 15 years old.

7.  The Santa Maria never made the journey home. It ran aground on Christmas day, stranding 40 men who could not fit on the other ships. They stayed behind on the island of Hispaniola.

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